Comstock Explains

Collection

Newspaper story from May 12, 1913 New York Times.

Anthony Comstock, head of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, said yesterday that he ordered the removal of Paul Chabas's "September Morning" from the display window of Braun & Co., art dealers at 13 West Forty-sixth Street, on Friday, after investigating a school teacher's complaint that objectionable pictures were being displayed in shops in the neighborhood.

"It is not a proper picture," Mr. Comstock said, "to be viewed by boys and girls. I went to the store in a perfectly civil manner, called attention to the laws concerning the display of improper pictures, and ordered the picture removed. There is nothing more sacred than the form of woman, but it must not be denuded. I think every one will agree with me that such pictures should not be displayed where school children passing through the street can see them."

Mr. Comstock declined to say what action he would take if the management of Braun & Co. continues to display the picture in the window.

Dublin Core

Title

Comstock Explains

Subject

September Morn
Anthony Comstock

Description

Newspaper story from May 12, 1913 New York Times.

Source

New York Times, May 12, 1913, pg. 5

Date

1913 - 05 - 12

Format

Newspaper Story

Language

en

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Newspaper Story Item Type Metadata

Headline

COMSTOCK EXPLAINS
Ordered "September Morning" from View Because Teacher Complained

Text

Anthony Comstock, head of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, said yesterday that he ordered the removal of Paul Chabas's "September Morning" from the display window of Braun & Co., art dealers at 13 West Forty-sixth Street, on Friday, after investigating a school teacher's complaint that objectionable pictures were being displayed in shops in the neighborhood.

"It is not a proper picture," Mr. Comstock said, "to be viewed by boys and girls. I went to the store in a perfectly civil manner, called attention to the laws concerning the display of improper pictures, and ordered the picture removed. There is nothing more sacred than the form of woman, but it must not be denuded. I think every one will agree with me that such pictures should not be displayed where school children passing through the street can see them."

Mr. Comstock declined to say what action he would take if the management of Braun & Co. continues to display the picture in the window.

Publication Date

1913-05-12

Newspaper Info

New York Times, pg. 5

Citation

"Comstock Explains," in September Morn Archive, Item #32, http://septembermorn.org/items/show/32 (accessed April 29, 2017).