"1958 Morn," cover of Humbug no. 7

The cover of Humbug volume 1, no. 7 (February 1958) features a parody of September Morn by Arnold Roth, "1958 Morn."

John Bunson explains that:

Quite appropriately Humbug's cover honors what was by far the most momentous event of 1957: mankind's first reach beyond the earth's atomsphere with Russia's launch of the Sputnik satellite on October 4th. . . Humbug's cover (aside from the sputniks) is a reproduction of Paul Chabas' painting "September Morn," which became famous when anti-vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the mayor of Chicago called it obscene. It is also controversial because, although it hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it is considered to be "kitsch" by man critics. (2:225)
Among the "sputniks" visible, one (from which the words "Arf Arf Woof Bow Wow" emanate) seems to reference Laika, the first dog sent into space as part of the Sputnik program.

Humbug was a briefly lived humor magazine began by Harvey Kurtzman in 1957. Kurtzman is most famous for founding Mad magazine. Benson and Gary Groth write that Kurtzman's preference was skewering pop artifacts and cultural trends—his primary targets had been movies, TV, comics and advertising—:in order to underscore the absurdity of American culture, and hsi tone was one of tolerant bemusement rather than moral censure" (1:xv). This cover exemplifies such gentle critique by satirically comparing American anxiety about the Soviet Space Program to the controversy surrounding Chabas's painting.

Works Cited

  • John Benson and Gary Groth, "Introduction" to Humbug, 2 vols. (Seattle: Fantagraphics Books, 2009).
  • Benson, "Annotations" to Humbug, 2 vols. (Seattle: Fantagraphics Books, 2009).

Dublin Core

Title

"1958 Morn," cover of Humbug no. 7

Subject

September Morn
Humbug
Space Travel

Description

The cover of Humbug volume 1, no. 7 (February 1958) features a parody of September Morn by Arnold Roth, "1958 Morn."

John Bunson explains that:

Quite appropriately Humbug's cover honors what was by far the most momentous event of 1957: mankind's first reach beyond the earth's atomsphere with Russia's launch of the Sputnik satellite on October 4th. . . Humbug's cover (aside from the sputniks) is a reproduction of Paul Chabas' painting "September Morn," which became famous when anti-vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the mayor of Chicago called it obscene. It is also controversial because, although it hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it is considered to be "kitsch" by man critics. (2:225)
Among the "sputniks" visible, one (from which the words "Arf Arf Woof Bow Wow" emanate) seems to reference Laika, the first dog sent into space as part of the Sputnik program.

Humbug was a briefly lived humor magazine began by Harvey Kurtzman in 1957. Kurtzman is most famous for founding Mad magazine. Benson and Gary Groth write that Kurtzman's preference was skewering pop artifacts and cultural trends—his primary targets had been movies, TV, comics and advertising—:in order to underscore the absurdity of American culture, and hsi tone was one of tolerant bemusement rather than moral censure" (1:xv). This cover exemplifies such gentle critique by satirically comparing American anxiety about the Soviet Space Program to the controversy surrounding Chabas's painting.

Works Cited

  • John Benson and Gary Groth, "Introduction" to Humbug, 2 vols. (Seattle: Fantagraphics Books, 2009).
  • Benson, "Annotations" to Humbug, 2 vols. (Seattle: Fantagraphics Books, 2009).

Creator

Arnold Roth (cover)

Source

Details about Humbug are available through the Grand Comic Book Database.

The complete run of Humbug is available in a two-volume set published by Fantagraphics Books.

Date

1958-02

Rights

Image Remains Copyright of Original Creator

Format

8.5in by 11in. Comic Book Format

Language

en

Contribution Form

Online Submission

No

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

Comic Book Cover

Physical Dimensions

8.5inches by 11inches.

Citation

Arnold Roth (cover), ""1958 Morn," cover of Humbug no. 7," in September Morn Archive, Item #55, http://septembermorn.org/items/show/55 (accessed September 22, 2018).